Differences persist on deadline day for Iran nuke talks

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, center, and British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, second right, waits with U.S. Under Secretary for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman, left, U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, second left, and others before a meeting with Russia, China, France, Germany, European Union and Iranian officials at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne, Switzerland Monday, March 30, 2015, during Iran nuclear talks. Negotiations over Iran's nuclear program are entering a critical phase with differences still remaining just two days before a deadline for the outline of an agreement. (AP Photo/Brendan Smialowski, Pool)Diplomats scrambled to reach consensus just hours ahead of a self-imposed deadline.



Indiana lawmakers try to quiet firestorm over new law

Indiana Senate Democratic Leader Tim Lanane, left, D-Anderson, and Indiana House Democratic Leader Scott Pelath, D-Michigan City, call for the repeal of the Indiana Religious Freedom Restoration Act during a press conference at the Statehouse in Indianapolis, Monday, March 30, 2015. Republican legislative leaders say they are working on adding language to a new state law to make it clear that it doesn't allow discrimination against gays and lesbians. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)GOP legislative leaders say they are working to clarify the religious-objections law.



Colorado theater gunman's mother says he's not a 'monster'

The mother of accused Colorado theater gunman James Holmes says in a new book that she prays for her son’s victims daily, even calling out the deceased by name. “The first time that I prayed for them by name and by wound, I was shaking, overcome,” Arlene Holmes writes.
Parents of dead student sue Clemson University, fraternity

By Harriet McLeod CHARLESTON, S.C. (Reuters) - The parents of a 19-year-old Clemson University student who died last year after falling from a highway bridge during a pre-dawn fraternity run sued the university, the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity and three of its members for $50 million on Monday. Tucker Hipps' body was found by police last September beneath a highway bridge over a lake near the Clemson, South Carolina campus when he didn't return from the run with other fraternity pledges. The two civil suits, which seek $25 million each, allege that Hipps died as a result of a confrontation with a fraternity member over breakfast food he was told to bring that morning. Hipps then went over the railing of the bridge into shallow water in Lake Hartwell head first, the lawsuits said, adding that a fraternity member shone a flashlight into the dark water below but took no further action to locate the student.
Detroit panel OKs raises for city officials: Detroit Free Press

Downtown Detroit is seen through a window from the State Of Michigan offices in DetroitBy Serena Maria Daniels DETROIT (Reuters) - Just months after Detroit officially exited the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history, a panel on Monday recommended raises of 2.5 percent for city council members and the city clerk, to start next fiscal year, a newspaper reported. The Detroit Elected Officials Compensation Commission, which determines whether elected officials can receive raises, voted unanimously on Monday night to support the pay hikes, the Detroit Free Press said. The move would bring the salary for the clerk and council members to $78,761 from $76,840 and the council president's to $82,776 from $80,757, the paper said. City Council President Brenda Jones and City Clerk Janice Winfrey made the request earlier in March.





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